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News Archive - Page 1

Latest News

 

 THINK BEFORE YOU BUY A DOG

 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED URGENTLY

We would very much like our dogs to be better socialised and would be very grateful if anyone can spare us a couple of hours a week to come and walk the dogs with us. The more dogs we take in, the more pairs of feet and hands we need to do justice to this wonderful breed. It is getting harder and harder to fit in doing the home checks with walking the dogs and looking after our own dogs at home - so can anyone spare a little time for the dogs less fortunate than our own, who need our help? 

Walking is also very good for getting rid of that extra few pounds, and also for clearing your head and blowing the cobwebs away .... come on, don't just sit there - get up and help if you can!

We are situated on the borders of Surrey and Kent, close to Godstone.

 

20.10.08

CALL OF THE WEEK

9.05 AM - Monday . Had a call from a lady whose daughter has just gone through a divorce. Her daughter has a six year old rottie male. Her daughter has moved into a smaller house and has asked her mother to try to get the dog into rescue. I tried to explain to the lady that we are all, as rescues, totally over run with unwanted dogs, and that as the dog has a home and a garden and is not left for too long, will be on our waiting list for a considerable time.The lady was not in the least bit interested - she simply said that they would put the dog down and the children would get over it. The dog is now surplus to requirements. 

My question is this - WHAT ARE WE TEACHING OUR CHILDREN?

I BELIEVE WE ARE TEACHING THEM THAT IT IS ACCEPTABLE TO KILL A LIVING CREATURE IF WE NO LONGER FEEL WE WANT IT. WE ARE TEACHING THEM THAT THEY NEED FEEL NO GUILT OR BLAME OR PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR ACTIONS AND CHOICES.I BELIEVE THIS HAS A "KNOCK ON" EFFECT ON THEIR ADULTHOOD AND THE WAY THEY, IN TURN, TREAT LIVING CREATURES. I AM PERSONALLY DISGUSTED THAT A FAIRLY WELL EDUCATED, MATURE LADY COULD EVEN CONSIDER THIS TO BE AN OPTION.

 

I love this poem - for me it really sums up what we deal with every day!

The family's dog was bought for a guard,
Chained to a post in a chilly backyard,
Housed in a shed that was airless and dark,
And every few weeks had a run in the park.


When boredom set in with no fun and no work,
One day it broke loose and went quietly berserk
Pa couldn't fathom just why it went wild,
As it flattened his wife and then bit his child.


The police were called in to sort out the mess,
And the whole sorry tale was revealed by the press,
The Rescue Society was really annoyed,
So, the dog was re-homed -- and the owners destroyed.
Author unknown

 

 

By popular request, another instalment in the lives of a small rescue..... but this time it is called......

 

               48 HOURS!

Tuesday, 14th October, 2008.

7.30    Get up, come downstairs to be greeted by three very excited, desperate for a tiddle and breakfast dogs. Let them out, make their breakfast, add the medication, and do last night's washing up while they are eating. Make a cup of tea. Let the dogs out again, keeping Lily separate from the two having breakfast as she is going to the vet for a dental.

8.00 have a quick wash, make the bed and put Lily in the car. Peter takes her off to be at the vets for 9.00 and I go to get ready to go to work (doing a couple of home visits - miles away). I go upstairs to run a bath and the phone rings. Run downstairs and take down the details of the dog that needs to come in, and explain to the lady that there are a shortage of places for dogs needing homes and that all we can do is place her dog on the waiting list. Go back upstairs. Bath is now run. Get in bath. Phone rings. Get out. Answer phone. Local dog warden needing a space for a dog. Go through same as before, but this time in the nude! Get back in bath. Don't believe it, phone rings AGAIN! Get out of bath again, pulling  plug as I go. Yet another dog to come in. Explain again. Finally dry myself off and get dressed. No time for make up or another cup of tea.

9.20   Speak to Lorraine about a couple of dogs and a homecheck. Lorraine is going to do a follow up visit this morning, and we agree to catch up later.

9.45  I give our dogs a tit bit and lock up the house - Peter is going straight from the vets to the kennels to walk the dogs we have in. I head off for my visits. The traffic is not too bad, and I am at my first visit by 11.00. Do the visit (for another rescue) then divert by 15 minutes to get my prescription from my doctors surgery ( I have lived in Kent for 5 months now, but still haven't had time to sign on with a local doctor!) Go to Mitcham to do my second visit.  Get there by 12.40 and am out of the door by 1.15. 

1.15  Get out the trusty Sat Nav and set it to West Norwood. It does the job nicely, and I arrive at the house where I am about to meet Kaiser, who I am picking up and taking into kennels. Kaiser greets me nicely, and after doing the necessary paperwork we get him into my car. (Not an easy job - he didn't want to come and has not been in a car before)

1.45  Set Sat Nav for the kennels again, and head off. Kaiser settles quite quickly in the car, and has the good grace not to vomit at all! We got to the kennels at 2.45. I took Kaiser round the field to stretch his legs and relieve himself, then settled him into his kennel. Peter phoned me to say he had done the shopping, walked the dogs and was now going to start some gardening. I then phoned the vet to check that Lily was ready for collection, and headed off there.

3.30  Got to the surgery. It was crowded. Nurse went to get Lily, but while I was waiting I stopped an English setter from pulling over the 3 year old child who was holding it (Mum was obviously a bit stupid) as it pulled towards another dog. Got Lily in the car, told the vet nurse we would see her tomorrow, and drove wearily home, looking forward to a quiet sit down (ha, ha, silly me).

4.15  Arrived home. Pete and I put a cage up for Lily as she was still a bit drowsy, and our two were bothering her a bit. Pete updates me on the dogs in the kennels, his chat with Lorraine about her follow up visit and what time we will meet her tomorrow. Phone rang. I answered and it was a young man who owns two rotts. One is a 9 month old spayed bitch. He had taken her to the vet as it is lame, and basically the dog has OCD and needs an operation, which he cannot afford. All the other rescues he has tried have said either they will not take her, or that they will take her and euthanaese her. I spoke to his vet, discussed what we could do with Pete, and we are working towards getting her into our care and getting the operation done - but we do need a foster home that is calm. Peter poured us a drink. I fed the dogs - making Lily a special soft dinner in case her mouth was still a bit sore.

5.00  I answered emails while Pete put the dinner on. The phone rang. Pete answered it and when he came off the phone we had another problem. A 20 week old puppy in a one bedroomed fourth floor flat  with a lady with a kind heart, but who was very unwell herself and unable to keep the dog she had rescued just a few weeks ago (see in our care). Pete got on with the job, and found a family friend who has owned rotts to go round and see exactly what the situation was.He then phone the people who were coming up to see Lily to confirm times, also the lady bringing Polly in tomorrow to confirm times.

6.30 Ate dinner. I was so tired I felt the best way to wake up would be to have a bath. Pete washed up while I had a bath. Came downstairs and the phone rang. It was another dog call - but about the 9 month old bitch we are already trying to help - it was a family member who did not know we had already been contacted.Reassured the lady we are doing our best to help and poured another drink. Got out all the relevant paperwork for tomorrow's jobs.

8.00  Gave our dogs a quick walk round the block.

8.45  Becki (friend) rang and said she was on her way over with one puppy in the back of her car. She also said "Put the kettle on!"

9.15 Set up another cage for the puppy, and said hello to him, Becki and Marc (guess who the pup is named after!) Made a cup of coffee and had a quick chat. Introduced all our dogs to puppy, and let them all out in the garden for a play.

10.45 Say goodbye to Becki and Marc and arrange to meet up for a curry one night. Sit down with a final drink  and settle the puppy in his new cage. Turn the lights off, clean teeth and fall into bed. The puppy is whining as he is unsettled and a bit disorientated. Pete is already asleep. I get into bed and fall instantly asleep.

15th October, 2008

8.00 Got up and came downstairs to be greeted by the dogs - eager as usual for a tiddle and breakfast. Pete is in the bath, and I am doing the dog's breakfast. Puppy has tiddled in the cage, so I let him out and clean up whilst making the breakfasts. Feed the dogs, give them their medication, and have a cuddle with the puppy.

8.30 Have a cup of tea. Pete goes out to clear up in the garden, and I go up to have a wash and get dressed.

9.00 Have another cuppa, and watch the news for half and hour, while the dogs are out in the garden. Pete gets the car out, and we get ready for the day, collecting the camera, paperwork and details on dogs and potential homes that we will need for the day. Arrange for next door neighbour to take in the polo shirt order when it arrives and leave a note on the gate for the courier.

10.00 Leave for the vet. Annie, the dog that Lorraine is fostering, may need an eye operation, and also needs spaying. We are meeting Lorraine at the vets to get his opinion on whether Annie's eye has improved with the treatment he prescribed last week. 10.40 Arrive at the kennels, with Lily and Marc the puppy in the back of the car. Marc has been sick, but is quite happy. Lorraine arrives, Pete cleans up the vomit, and we get Annie into the vet. Our vet examines Annie's eye, and is very pleased with the progress. He does not feel that an operation will be necessary, so we book her in for a spay tomorrow.

11.30 Arrive back at the kennels. Our 11.30 appointment is waiting. He gets his dog out of the car, and we all go off into the field to introduce the dogs to each other. Pete goes to find a spare kennel for puppy. Lorraine also settles Annie into a kennel, as we are taking her to be spayed tomorrow.

12.00 The introduction between Lily and Taz goes very well, and the people love her to bits. By this time Pete and Lorraine are in the field too, and we are all chatting about dogs and settling dogs into new homes. Lily has found a home! So, out comes the paperwork, and off she goes with her new owners.

12.30 Our 1 o'clock appointment is early. Alice has come into care as her owner was struggling to cope with her. We go over and introduce ourselves and do the paperwork. Then we take Alice for a stroll to try and calm her a bit, as she is quite stressed and uncertain about what is happening. Pete settles her in a kennel while Lorraine and I give Annie a quick walk. Lorraine leaves as she needs to get back for work.

1.15 Peter and I work our way through walking the rest of the dogs - Ben, Porsche, Tally and Polly.

2.15 Get in the car, with aching feet, and drive to the nearest pub for a coffee and a sandwich. Little Marc has got a foster home, and we are dropping him off to it on the way home. Stop at pet shop, buy him some puppy food, grab a bit of fish and some ready to cook chips for our dinner, and head for his foster home. Drop Marc off, drive home - arriving at 3.40 and then clean up the car and bring in the paperwork.

3.45 Let our dogs out in the garden, and take down the numbers of the five dog related messages on the answer phone. All of them are dogs to come in. Feed our dogs while Pete goes to see if the polo shirts have arrived. They haven't.

4.00 Start answering the calls - get through to four out of the five, and leave a message for the other one. Into office to answer e mails.

4.30 Start to update website - putting on the photos I took whilst walking the dogs and writing a little about each dog, then start to write this - as I am writing it, Pete has located our polo shirts and answered about 6 phone calls.

7.00 I have now finished all I am doing today on the website - I am going to see if Pete has had time to put the dinner on and then I will start to pack up the polo shirts.

 

I PREDICT AN EARLY NIGHT - WE CAN'T

WAIT TO GO TO BED AND NOR CAN OUR

FEET !

 

These photos are reproduced from a

newspaper article about a rottweiler who

was found abandoned and close to death

after months of neglect and cruelty.He is

now in the care of a small rescue in

Manchester. We were so moved by these

photos that we have sent a donation of

£100 from the rescue funds to help with

the cost of nursing him back to health as

we felt that this is what you would want

us to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02.09.08.

Today we have received a note of thanks from Animals in Distress which reads as follows

Thank you very much for your extremely generous donation to us for £100. It was very much appreciated as is your concern for Benson. He is receiving all the love, care and attention possible, hopefully all bringing him to full health no matter how long it takes. Many thanks too for your offer of assistance. Best Wishes and Kind Regards

PHOTOS

 We are often sent photos of dogs being walked by children,  cuddled by children, or sat on by children. Although many of these photos are very nice we do not feel we can put them on the website as we feel these photos send out the wrong message to newcomers to the breed.

It is very difficult to show people that there are rottweilers out there who are very soft, and love children and are happy to be sat on, played with or cuddled by them. However, there are rottweilers that would not tolerate this....and we have to accept that you need to know your own dog very well and have a very good knowledge of dogs to gauge whether your dog would be  happy and safe in such circumstances.

With regard to children walking dogs, we really feel it is unsafe for children to do this, however well behaved and trained the dog is. So please don't be upset or offended if we do not publish these kinds of photos on the website.

 

We hope you all had a great Xmas and New Year with your loved ones - including of course, the furry ones!

We thought you might like to know how our year progressed- the highs and lows, the good and bad, so here goes.

January started the same way it usually does - cold, wet and miserable, but our lovely Billy, who had had such a bad time, finally found his new home. Our thanks to Darren, who took on this lovely young dog who had been through two major operations for osteochondritis, a very painful condition that can only be treated with surgery.

In the middle of January, we had to take in four eight week old puppies which I (Shelley) was going to foster. The next day I tripped over Pete's dog, Stan, dislocated my elbow and ended up in plaster for 6 weeks! I drove Pete mad, and the puppies had to go into kennels - not the best start to the year, but the puppies were all rehomed and they have settled well.

In March I took lessons in updating our new website- and there was a lot of bad language involved! Whilst on the subject of the website, when we decided to have a website designed we really had no idea whether it would generate any interest or homes. It had really be a success, with at least six of our harder to rehome dogs finding new homes as a direct result. It has also been an eye opener for us with so many people ringing us not because they don't want their dog but because they are experiencing some behavioural problems with their dog and need some advice.We now send out behaviour advice free of charge, advise by phone and help people who are prepared to work through the problem behaviours with their dogs. It is time consuming, but very rewarding to know that we have helped some dogs to stay in their homes, rather than being put into rescue centres or euthanaesed.

April saw the only bit of decent hot weather we got all year, and with it came Noo Noo, abandoned in a van in 30 degree heat. It also brought us Charlie, our lad who had so many health problems due to neglect - entropion, flea allergy dermatitis and needing hind dew claw removal and castration. Both dogs have been happily rehomed. Charlie was actually a blessing for us - he found us Lorraine - the lady who was contacted about him originally. Lorraine has owned rotts for many years and has now joined us. We don't know what we did without her! Lorraine works very hard to find good homes for the dogs, has taken on some of the dog walking and is very enthusiastic and supportive of the dogs and the rescue.

July saw us lose our own lovely girl, Remi to a bone tumour. The house is still not the same without her, despite the other two "Herberts" keeping us on our toes!

August - we had two dogs needing cruciate ligament operations - very expensive, but we put the story on the website and got a lovely donation which helped with the veterinary bills.

September was hectic - the Sponsored Walk, hundreds (well, it seemed like hundreds) of sandwiches to make, forms to produce and send out, and the usual day to day stuff as well.

The walk was held in Greenwich Park, our usual venue, and was very well attended by old faces and new - wehad thirty two dogs of all shapes, sizes and breed and about sixty people. The only disappointment was that this year we had been pledged a lot of money from people who attended the walk, and despite gentle reminders, the money did not materialise. This is very upsetting as we only do one fundraiser a year, and we had hoped that it would be the best year ever, so that we could help more dogs. We did raise just over £5,000 - a lovely sum, but if we had got in all the money pledged it would have been over £6,000.

In Ovtober we were asked to take in an 11 year old bitch - the lovely Sophie. We decided that as her case was so genuine, and she was such a nice old lady, we would try to help her. We took her on the basis that if we could not find a home she would stay with us for the rest of her days. We didn't hold our much hope of getting anyone interested in her. Within a month we had three serious offers of homes for her, and Sophie is now happily settled in Suffolk with her new family. We then took a 9 year old bitch, Cassie, and within two weeks had several people interested in giving her a home. She too is now very happy and settled in her new home. Thank you to all those people willing to give our "Golden Girls" a chance of a new home. It has really spurred us on to know that there are people out there who love this breed and have enough heart to care for the old as well as the young. We now have a waiting list for oldies! Absolutely wonderful!

In November we moved to another kennels. We had been at Barn Owl for 6 years and were very happy with the kennels. The owners let the field that we used out to a guy who was doing security dog training courses. We did not feel that it was appropriate for a rescue to be in any way associated with this kind of training and that it would ultimately be detrimental to the rescue to even appear to condone this kind of training. We have moved to Ladyhaye kennels, who are very kind and look after our dogs very well.

December - we were asked to take a six month old puppy a week before Xmas and one of our kind homes who already have two large dogs, three cats, a rabbit and two kids very kindly offered to foster him. Our thanks to Mel and Kevin for giving this little lad a foster home until we can find him a home .

 

So, the year has been quite a mix - 270 dogs needing homes -heartbreaking. Some of the reasons geniune, some ridiculous.

28 dogs rehomed - our best year ever.

Lots of good homes found as a direct result of the website - money well spent.

Lots of backing and interest from readers of the site - great.

Some very practical help from Lorraine, Kim and Julie, Kevin and Mel - thank you all.

Finally, we would like to thank all of you for your support this year, the dogs really need us all to pull together


OUR OWN DOGS, STAN AND PENNY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 18.9.08

DO YOU THINK THIS WOULD HELP?

 

A breeder contacted me with this idea. She has suggested that one way of controlling the amount and whereabouts of puppies being bred would be for it to become compulsory for breeders of any dog to have the dog microchipped, with a microchip that is specifically to show who bred the dog. A "breeder" microchip. This chip would be totally separate from the usual microchip, and would not be transferred to the new owners or any one else. The new owner could then have the dog identichipped to show ownership. However, if the dog turned up in a rescue or was abandoned or mistreated, the breeder would be easily contacted via the breeder's chip. It would then be the breeder's responsibility to look after the dog in question. If the breeder was unwilling, then there would be grounds for not allowing them to register their future litters. It would also have the effect of making breeders think far more carefully about where their puppies are going, and how often they are breeding. Obviously, there would have to be some kind of legislation by the local authorities or a specifically designed government body to police this. Having heard the story of a 6 year old rottweiler who has been rehomed 4 times due to bad selection of homes, I feel that this could be a way forward.

 

WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

 

This is a geniune question - not a "begging" letter. We have 9 dogs in kennels at the moment and can afford 5. Kenneling costs £8 per day, plus all the veterinary costs. We also only have one pair of legs each! The phone rang, and we were asked to take two rottweiler bitches. They are 3 and 4 years old, have lived with a child of 7. They are o.k. with other dogs, but not cats. Neither are spayed or up to date with their vaccinations. The owner is going abroad in a weeks time. She has tried the big rescues and no one will take the dogs. She has said if we don't take the dogs she will have them put down. The lady was not interested in discussing other ways to help, or in any suggestions for other places to try - she was quite rude and extremely uncaring about the dogs she has had from puppies.

THINK ABOUT IT

 

WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

 

THIS IS WHAT WE DID....

Friday ....

6.00 a.m. Got up, fed our own two dogs and Hippo, the foster puppy and let them all out in the garden for half an hour.

6.30a.m. Made a cup of tea, took it in turns to use the bathroom and have a wash and get dressed.

7.20a.m. Put our own dogs in the car and headed for the kennels.

8.00a.m. Arrived at the kennels, and walked our two round the field for 15 minutes (both of us feeling guilty at putting them into kennels for the day!)

8.15a.m. Walked Fifi round the field for 15 minutes, then put her in the car, ready to start the journey to her new home.

8.30a,m Set out for Bournemouth, where Fifi's new owners were waiting for her. Got on the dreaded M25 - got to Junction 9 where the sign said "long delays to Junction 11". I thought I'd be clever and took Peter on a long circuitous route of Chessington, Esher etc to arrive at Junction 10, where we could pick up the A3 instead of the M3 at Junction 12 if it was indeed jammed. This all took about 35 minutes, instead of the seven or eight minutes if we had kept on the M25. We got to Junction 10, there were no queues and so we got back on to the M25 having wasted half an hour. I was fairly low in the popularity stakes at this point!

10.50a.m.Arrived at Fifi's new home, and had a well earned cup of tea and a cake! Settled her in with her new owners and left for Portsmouth.

11.45.a.m. Set the Sat Nav for Portsmouth and hit the motorway again. Got stuck in traffic for quite a while. Arrived at the house in Portsmouth at 12.50.

12.50p.m.Knocked at the door. Door was answered by a lady and three rottweiler bitches - all of them large! There was also a small terrier type mongrel milling about. Peter asked the lady if she had written us the notes on the dogs that we had asked for - she said she hadn't had time. We then asked a couple of basic questions and were given very non commital answers. We then asked for their collars and leads. The lady could not find either collars or leads, so we went back to the car and got some. We then put the collars and leads on the dogs, and got the lady to sign the dogs over. At this point she said that the mongrel had to go too. (The third rottweiler belonged to her son and he was keeping it) Peter and I looked at each other, asked if we could take the mongrel too, but she said she wanted to find it a home herself. We got the two girls into the car and drove round the corner. We parked up, and looked at each other in disbelief. I set the wonderful Sat Nav again, and we headed back for the kennels.

1.45.p.m. Stopped at Petrol station for some petrol and a plastic sandwich! When we got back to the car one of the girls was on the front seat, but very kindly moved back without a fuss when asked to!

2.50p.m. Arrived back at the kennels. Got the girls out of the car and gave them a walk around the field to relieve themselves before going into kennels.

3.10.p.m. Walked the other four dogs in kennels.

4.15.p.m. Got Penny and Byron out of kennels, put them in the car and headed for home.

5.00.p.m. Arrived home and let the dogs into the garden. Puppy Hippo (who had been looked after very well by a friend) was very pleased to see us, so peed on the floor!

5.10.p.m. Made a cup of tea, and started to answer the five messages relating to dogs we had had whilst out.

6.00.p.m. Put the oven on for dinner. Both of us were so tired we could hardly speak.

7.00.p.m. Ate dinner, gave Hippo his last meal of the day, and gave Penny and Byron their yoghurt and tablets. FINALLY sat down. We both fell asleep watching T.V. Went to bed and slept like the dead! Well worth it though!

P.S. We drove about 260 miles, and walked about 5 miles - not bad for two old codgers eh?

 

I came in from work the other day to find Peter sitting on the sofa looking miserable. I asked what was wrong. He explained that he had had a letter offering him help with his heating bills now that he is over 60. He said he needed help with his feet, not his heat!

 

 

We are used to taking calls from people who have little or no understanding of a dogs needs or emotions, and even less care, but one of today's calls took the biscuit for stupidity. The guy phoned to ask us to rehome his 6 year old bitch, who they have had since she was a puppy. The reason for this is that they are having a baby, and this morning the dog killed one of their new kittens. In the conversation it transpired that the dog had had one of their adult cats in its mouth some months ago. I asked why he had bought two kittens knowing that the dog was not good with cats. He said "Because I like cats"! I explained that because the dog had killed a kitten did not mean that the dog would be aggressive to a baby but his mind was made up. Oh, and by the way, it needs to be rehomed in the next week!

 

 

IN MEMORY OF DUDE

Today we recieved a donation of £480 in memory of a very special dog, Dude. Dude was owned by Caz Williamson, and she has written about her special lad as follows:

No matter how many rottweilers you have through your life, you love them all, but sometimes there is one that takes a special place deep in your heart. For me that was Dude.

This is his story.

At eight weeks old Dude was bought by a guy who wanted a guard dog - he was Caz's partner. He took Dude home, held him up for Caz to see and said "You are not allowed near him. He is going to be vicious." He then dropped Dude to the ground. Dude quickly learned to keep out of the way of this nasty man. He would kick and punch Caz and then turn on Dude. Caz would stand in front of him so that Dude had time to run.

  Even though she was not supposed to, Caz would take Dude out to socialise him and train him, so that he did not become the vicious dog that her partner wanted him to be.

They both put up with the physical abuse for 18 months. Then one day, after a particularly nasty attack on Caz, Dude stepped in. While the guy was threatening Caz, Dude ran and knocked the guy over, and stood growling and snarling to protect her.

They left that day, and Caz vowed that no one would ever hurt Dude or her, ever again.

Caz writes:

That was the only time Dude ever growled at anyone. He was a gentle giant with good manners.

In July 2007, at just 5 years and two months old, beautiful Dude suddenly became seriously ill. Tests showed he had extensive liver cancer. At 6 p.m. I sat with him for an hour on the vets' floor. He was so ill but still managed to give me a big lick. He lifted his paw up and rested his head in my arms. I held him while he went to sleep for the last time. My heart broke into a million pieces that night. Dude saved my life but I couldn't save his. I miss him so much.

 

 

 

IN MEMORY OF MRS V. CHARD

 This week we received a wonderful donation of £1,000 which was left to us by Mrs Valerie Chard. The letter from her daughter says that Mrs Chard loved all dogs, and admired the work of rescues in helping all unwanted animals. Her special love was rottweilers, and she owned two. Her remaining rottweiler, Leah, is 10 years old and now lives happily with Mrs Chard's son and daughter in law.

Mrs Chard's legacy will be used to improve the lot of this much maligned breed, which is in so much trouble. The money will be spent wisely, helping dogs that would otherwise have no place to go, and no comfort in their lives.

We would like to offer our condolences to the relatives and friends of Mrs Chard.

 

ANOTHER DAY IN THE LIFE......

7.00 Alarm rings. Get up, feed Penny and Byron (who actually look a bit annoyed to be woken up so early) and jump in the bath.

Peter is having a cup of tea, and doing last night's washing up. (left after dinner as the phone rang until 10.30)

7.45 I am upstairs, making the bed and hoovering. Peter is now in the bath.

8.15 Make a coffee and have a cigarette.

8.30 On computer, checking e mails and answering them, also printing out some more forms as we have two dogs coming into care today.

9.00 Pack bag with details of the dogs coming in, camera to take their photos, and the sausages we cooked for the dogs last night.

9.10 Leave home for the kennels, having put Penny and Byron in the car with us.

10.00 Arrive at the kennels and take our two round the field. It is starting to get hot, so we find a spare kennel to put them in. Penny's face is a picture of disgust!

10.30 Jackie and Reg, who have had a dog from us before, arrive with their male staffie called Dave. They have come to look at Yogi, as their old male rott George has sadly passed away. Get Yogi out, take both dogs on lead into the field, then head for the paddock which is enclosed for dog to dog introductions. Spend some time watching the reactions of both dogs, before letting the dogs off lead. Reg, Peter and I all light up a cigarette! (relief, it is all going well)

11.00 Walk the two dogs, who are by now getting on famously, round the field. Go back to the car, load Yogi in, and do the relevant paperwork.

11.10 Wave goodbye to Jackie, Reg, Yogi and Dave.

11.15 Walk the lovely Tina round the field and practise recalls - she really is coming on well.

11.35 Meet Sam, our latest foster carer, who is coming up with Max, whom she has been fostering for a few days. We are taking Max to the vets for his second vaccination.

12.00 Get to the vets. Max has his examination, is given a clean bill of health and his second vaccination. Our vet points out when I show him the "tick" on Max's neck, that frontline and vaseline won't work on it, as it is in fact a wart! 30 years in rotts and we can still get it wrong!

12.40 Say goodbye to Sam and Max, and drive back to the kennels - stopping for the usual "garage" snack as lunch.

1.00 Arrive at kennels to find both dogs and owners waiting for us. Brush the crumbs from our tops, and go to work.

The first dog is Rocky, who has been brought down by a kind young couple from Huddersfield. Rocky has been abandoned by his owner, and they had been feeding him for the last fortnight. We all walked round the field together, and they were both so upset at the thought of leaving this lovely young dog, that they phoned a friend who has rented them a house to live in so that they can keep the dog! Well, that has never happened to us before!

The other dog is Bertie, whose owner also abandoned him, locking him in a cupboard before leaving. The neighbours went in and found him, and fed and watered him for a week, before asking us to take him into care. Bertie is about 14 months old, very friendly but a bit disorientated by the changes in his life. Peter and I took him for a walk, took his photo, then settled him down into his kennel.

1.50 Walk Robbie and Roy, who are coming along very well and are now off the lead in the field. We practice some recalls with them - they are getting the hang of it all slowly. Roy gives me a bit of fuss for the first time.

2.15 Get the sausages out of the car and go back into kennels to give all the dogs a couple of sausages. Bertie won't eat his - not unusual - everything is too scary at the moment.

2.20 Get ours out of the kennel, put them in the car and head for home.

2.50 Stop at the bank - Peter has forgotten to pay the rates and has a not very pleasant letter in his pocket reminding him to do it! While he is in the bank, I pop into the Co-op to buy a bottle of wine and some cigarettes.

3.15 Get home.

3.30 Feed the dogs and give them their tablets. Pick up the four messages on the answerphone.

3.35 Ring back two potential homes and have a chat, get some details and promise to ring one back when her daughter is home as it is daughter who will be the owner of the dog. The other potential home is for Max, who is in foster - make a note to call Sam later and discuss it with her.

4.00 Explain to a lady with a 5 year old bitch that we have a waiting list, but are happy to take her details. Look at the ever growing list of dogs needing help.

4.15 Peter goes out to do some gardening, with instructions to listen out for the phone as I am going to start updating the website.

4.55 Start filing the paperwork for today, type a letter to transfer the microchip for Bertie into our name and write out the cheque to go with it. Send out a couple of behaviour booklets that people have asked for.

5.30 Put the oven on. Sit in the garden for half an hour admiring the view. Discuss whether we can fit in any more follow up visits this week. Phone rings. It is Jackie with Yogi, just phoning to reassure us that everything is fine. Thanks Jackie!

5.50 Put the steak on. Start to sort through the list of dogs needing to come in to find a couple to bring in as we have a bit of space. Both get very upset at having to make choices between one dog and another. Pour a drink (the first of several)

6.15 Dinner on the table. Phone rings. I answer and it is the lady I need to speak to from earlier. I ask her if I can call her back in half an hour. She is very nice and tells me to eat my dinner!

6.45 Speak to lady and get more details on her lifestyle etc. Will do a home check in next couple of days.

6.55 Peter starts doing his calls-follow up calls and thank yous to sponsors. I wash up.

7.30 Phone rings. It is a lady whose dogs have had pups and she cannot find them homes. We arrange to phone her back, then call the kennel manager at home to see if we can put them into kennels until we can find them foster homes. She agrees, bless her. Phone the owner back, and arrange for the puppies to come in.

7.50 Phone Sam, the foster carer, and leave her a message. Sit down to watch "The Bill".

8.20 Phone rings Peter answers it and tells my mate that I'll ring her back after the programme.

9.00 Sam rings and Pete discusses the possible home for Max with her. Sam then makes us very, very, happy. She has decided to keep Max. Max is so happy with Sam, she takes him to the beach for a swim, plays with him and just generally loves him to bits! Put the phone down and have a bit of a tear in our eyes for the lovely lady and the nice old dog. What a great day!

9.30 Speak to Lorraine, to keep her updated on what dogs are in etc and tell her the great news about Max.

10.10 Finally get to speak to my mate but can't keep my eyes open!

10.30 Pour another drink, light another fag and sit and relax for an hour.

11.45 Let the dogs out for a final tiddle, and hit the sack - tired but very happy.

                                     SADLY MISSED

09.09.08

Sophie, the lovely old girl owned by Michael and Diane and their family, has sadly had to be put to sleep. Sophie entered their lives in November 2007. Diane had looked on the website and could not get Sophie out of her mind. She discussed the problems of having an old dog with the family, and they all agreed that they could give Sophie a comfortable home for the rest

  of her days. Sophie really fell on her paws when she found them - and she knew it! She instantly adored Diane, and the feeling was mutual. She liked a little walk, but loved a cuddle more. Unfortunately, although sharp as ever in her mind, Sophie's legs just would not carry her any more, and Diane and Michael made the hard decision. Sophie was put to sleep at home, with everything familiar around her. She will be missed by everyone who knew her.

 

A GREAT BIG THANK YOU TO

 

FRED AND DAVINIA .

Fred and Davinia, who have two dogs from us, recently celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary, and also held a works reunion.

Those at the celebration felt that they would like to contribute towards the cost of the celebrations, and despite protests, filled a champagne bucket with money.

Fred and Davinia decided they would like the money raised to go to our rescue to help with the cost of Lulu's veterinary treatment.

We received a cheque for the amazing sum of £472.50.

Our thanks to all those who contributed and we would like to wish Fred and Davinia many more happy years together.

 

OUR THANKS TOO, TO THE ANONYMOUS SPONSOR WHO TRANSFERRED £3O INTO THE ROTTWEILER TRUST ACCOUNT ON 8TH MAY. WE WOULD VERY MUCH LIKE YOU TO CONTACT US SO THAT WE CAN THANK YOU PROPERLY.

 

OUR THANKS ALSO TO ROTTWEILERS ONLINE U.K. WHO HAVE SENT US ANOTHER DONATION FROM THE MEMBERS OF THEIR WEBSITE.


 

Our darling Stan was put to sleep yesterday. Our lovely boy had been diagnosed with a bone tumour about fifteen months ago. He had spent his last months doing all the things he loved - having a "lie in" in the morning, sitting on the patio watching the world go by and getting fatter every day due to the vast amounts of tit bits he conned us out of!

  Stan was originally rescued from a pig farm, where he was housed in a sty. Stan was not getting on with the other male rott and so he had to go. Stan has been a joy to know and own, and a real credit to the breed. A dog you could take anywhere, he loved people, although never really got over his dislike of other male dogs.Stan was 11 years old and our only consolation is that his end was peaceful.

Stan will be so very missed.


 

We are often told when talking to someone who cannot keep their dog "We don't want any money for it" or "I paid £600 for it". FACE FACTS - IT IS POSSIBLE TO PICK UP A ROTTWEILER FOR LESS THAN £100 WITHIN HALF AN HOUR OF YOUR HOME, ANYTHING FROM 8 WEEKS OLD TO 10 YEARS OLD. OF COURSE, YOU WILL NOT GET THE BACK UP AND PROFFESSIONAL ADVICE YOU MAY VERY WELL NEED AND IF YOU DECIDE YOU CANNOT KEEP YOUR DOG THE CHANCES OF THE BREEDER/SELLER TAKING IT BACK ARE VERY SLIM.

 

VETS AND DOGS

We get quite a few calls from people who have problems when taking their dog to the vet. Many dogs react very badly to being handled by a relative stranger, and may not be feeling at their best when they are taken to the vet. Our own dogs are no exception. Of our four, we have four widely differing reactions. Stan, a 10 year old male, loves the vet and does not flinch from an injection, a complete physical examination and just wants to lick whoever is handling him - this is not really very pleasant as he has usually been sick on the way there!

Penny, our 8 year old bitch, travels to the vet very well, but when she gets there becomes very agitated and shakes with fear before we even get her into the surgery. She has to be muzzled to enable the vet to even get close enough to see her!

Byron, our 5 year old male is good in the car and o.k. with the vet providing they do not over handle him and pull him about, but he can "have a go" if he feels the vet is going too far!

Lulu, the one year old bitch we are fostering has had a couple of painful and quite major operations, but is so laid back she falls asleep on the surgery floor whilst waiting for the vet, and licks him to death whatever he does to her!

We recently rehomed a very sweet bitch, but she recently cut her pad and showed a completely different side to her nature when taken to the vet.

There are no easy answers to this problem. It is important to remember that dogs are often only taken into a vet's surgery when they are already in pain, or are having something unpleasant done to them, such as an innoculation.

If you have a dog from a puppy, it is worth taking the dog to see the veterinary staff on a regular basis, just to get the dog used to going there, the sights and smells and being handled by other people without the dog actually needing to have anything unpleasant done.

One of our experienced rescue dog owners has recently taken a 4 year old male from us and has started taking his dog into the surgery once a week to get him used to the staff and surroundings, before the dog needs any treatment. It has worked so well that now the dog pulls him towards the door of the surgery when they go past!

Remember that when taking your dog to the vet, you need to remain calm and be in full control of the dog. If this means muzzling the dog to stop it from making a mistake through fear or pain, then muzzle it. It is no use apologising after the dog has bitten.

 

 

 

A DAY IN THE LIFE...of a little rescue

7.00 Got up, came downstairs and let our own three dogs out with Lulu, our foster dog.

7.15 Gave the dogs their breakfast and medication (one of our dogs has cancer, and one needs painkillers for a hip problem and Lulu has had an ear operation.

7.30 Made a cup of tea and had a cigarette!

8.00 Peter left for the kennels (about 35 minutes drive away) to pick up two young males to go to the vet's for castration. I cleaned up Lulu's ears and then went upstairs, had a bath and made the bed and hoovered.

9.10 Phone rang. Guy with two dogs that he wanted to rehome. I took the details on the dogs, explained about the numbers of dogs needing help and tried to calm the situation down (his wife has two young children and another on the way and feels that having two dogs as well is too much for her)

9.25 I started to update the website. Phone rang again. It was a call from some people we had rehomed a dog to, saying that she was getting on just fine in her new home - great!

9.55 Peter arrived back, had a quick cup of tea and went upstairs for a bath.

10.50 Got our new Sat Nav system out of its box and tried to work out how to use it! (We got this as trying to find an address is the only time we end up having a row!)

11.00 Suddenly remembered that I needed to post off some behaviour advice booklets. Got them out, found the addresses and got them ready to post.

11.15 Left home to do a home check. Could not make Sat Nav work but I had a back up plan - an AA route finder map I had printed off yesterday(Clever girl!)

11.55 Got to Essex. Map took us into a dead end which was not where we wanted to be. Phoned the lady who very kindly came out and found us!!

12.15 Got to the home check, looked at the fencing (6ft, secure) and met her existing dog. Had a cup of tea and a chat about rescue dogs and talked to her about the dog we have in mind for her. She is coming to see him on Sunday.

1.00 Left the home check. Got the Sat Nav working - just a couple of problems - Peter knew the way home anyway (thanks for that Pete) and I couldn't work out how to turn the volume up on it so Pete couldn't hear it anyway! Back to the drawing board I think.

1.45 Got home, let the dogs out, gave them a titbit and went back to the vets to pick the boys up. On the way, stopped at a garage and got a take away coffee and a sausage roll. Yummy!

2.20 Got to the vets, paid the bill (Ouch) and took the boys back to kennels.

2.40 Started to walk the other dogs in kennels. They all had a great time and so did we.

3.30 Started out for home. Stopped at M & S to buy something quick to make for dinner and also to pick up a bottle of wine and a little bottle of brandy. This was over with very quickly as we both hate shopping!

4.15 Arrived home. Fed our dogs and let them out again. I took the three messages off the answerphone and got back to the people. One was a girl who wanted to give her dog up, one was from one of the reps about a home check and the other was actually a personal call! (God knows how they got through!)

5.00 Took Lulu's Elizabethan collar off and cleaned her up properly. Her neck was stiff with dried blood after the operation and was uncomfortable. Cleaned her ears again. Put the collar back on.

5.30 Phoned the rep who is fostering the dog that may be going on Sunday, gave her all the details on the people and had a chat with her.

5.50 Pete poured us a drink! Lovely. Phone rang. It was the guy who I spoke to this morning, to say that his wife had relented and they were going to keep their dogs. I'm really pleased for him.

6.15 Checked my e-mails. Replied to a couple of "doggie" ones.

6.20 Pete answered a couple of calls - one from a guy who wants a dog, one from someone wanting to give their dog up.

6.45 Getting hungry. Put the oven on. Popped our dogs out for a walk.

7.15 Put the dinner on and sat in the kitchen sorting out old paperwork, people who want dogs and discussing how to progress with the dogs we have in kennels, and address any special help a dog needs.

7.55 Picked phone up to check it was still working as it hadn't rung for a while!

8.00 Dished up dinner. Phone rang! Asked the lady if I could call her back in 15 minutes. Ate dinner.

8.20 Phoned lady back Would like a dog. Have told her I will arrange to get her home checked.

8.40 Phoned the rep to ask her to do the home check. Pete is giving our dogs their medication and a titbit.

9.00 Stuck dishes in the sink, and sat down to watch Ashes to Ashes with a large brandy and coke in my case, and a large glass of wine in Pete's!

10.00 Let the dogs out for a final tiddle, and went wearily to bed!

If this sounds like a moan, it isn't - we enjoy it all!


THE GIRLS AT THE KENNELS, ENJOYING A WELL EARNED BREAK (thanks for all the coffees , girls)



 

 


THE THINGS PEOPLE SAY!

 

Caller: Will you take my dog? I paid £800 for it, but I am prepared to let you have it for £400!!!!!

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Caller: I need to rehome my dog. He has a really good pedigree but I don't want any money for him!

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Caller: I want to get rid of my dog

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Caller : I want to do the best for my dog (means I want to get rid of my dog)

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

Caller: Is that the Rottweiler rescue?

Me: Yes.

Caller: Have you got any boxers?

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Caller: My dog is really getting me down, he wants to play all day, never sits still and I think I really need to rehome him.

Peter: You should have got an old plodder

Caller: I didn't realise you did other breeds as well!

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Shelley :So you need to rehome your dog.

Caller : Yes.

Shelley : Has the dog ever been to training classes?

Caller : No, but my husband has trained the dog and he is really good at dog training.

Shelley : Why are you getting rid of the dog?
Caller : I can't walk it, it pulls me down the road!


We hope you all had a great Xmas and New Year with your loved ones - including of course, the furry ones!

We thought you might like to know how our year progressed- the highs and lows, the good and bad, so here goes.

January started the same way it usually does - cold, wet and miserable, but our lovely Billy, who had had such a bad time, finally found his new home. Our thanks to Darren, who took on this lovely young dog who had been through two major operations for osteochondritis, a very painful condition that can only be treated with surgery.

In the middle of January, we had to take in four eight week old puppies which I (Shelley) was going to foster. The next day I tripped over Pete's dog, Stan, dislocated my elbow and ended up in plaster for 6 weeks! I drove Pete mad, and the puppies had to go into kennels - not the best start to the year, but the puppies were all rehomed and they have settled well.

In March I took lessons in updating our new website- and there was a lot of bad language involved! Whilst on the subject of the website, when we decided to have a website designed we really had no idea whether it would generate any interest or homes. It had really be a success, with at least six of our harder to rehome dogs finding new homes as a direct result. It has also been an eye opener for us with so many people ringing us not because they don't want their dog but because they are experiencing some behavioural problems with their dog and need some advice.We now send out behaviour advice free of charge, advise by phone and help people who are prepared to work through the problem behaviours with their dogs. It is time consuming, but very rewarding to know that we have helped some dogs to stay in their homes, rather than being put into rescue centres or euthanaesed.

April saw the only bit of decent hot weather we got all year, and with it came Noo Noo, abandoned in a van in 30 degree heat. It also brought us Charlie, our lad who had so many health problems due to neglect - entropion, flea allergy dermatitis and needing hind dew claw removal and castration. Both dogs have been happily rehomed. Charlie was actually a blessing for us - he found us Lorraine - the lady who was contacted about him originally. Lorraine has owned rotts for many years and has now joined us. We don't know what we did without her! Lorraine works very hard to find good homes for the dogs, has taken on some of the dog walking and is very enthusiastic and supportive of the dogs and the rescue.

July saw us lose our own lovely girl, Remi to a bone tumour. The house is still not the same without her, despite the other two "Herberts" keeping us on our toes!

August - we had two dogs needing cruciate ligament operations - very expensive, but we put the story on the website and got a lovely donation which helped with the veterinary bills.

September was hectic - the Sponsored Walk, hundreds (well, it seemed like hundreds) of sandwiches to make, forms to produce and send out, and the usual day to day stuff as well.

The walk was held in Greenwich Park, our usual venue, and was very well attended by old faces and new - wehad thirty two dogs of all shapes, sizes and breed and about sixty people. The only disappointment was that this year we had been pledged a lot of money from people who attended the walk, and despite gentle reminders, the money did not materialise. This is very upsetting as we only do one fundraiser a year, and we had hoped that it would be the best year ever, so that we could help more dogs. We did raise just over £5,000 - a lovely sum, but if we had got in all the money pledged it would have been over £6,000.

In Ovtober we were asked to take in an 11 year old bitch - the lovely Sophie. We decided that as her case was so genuine, and she was such a nice old lady, we would try to help her. We took her on the basis that if we could not find a home she would stay with us for the rest of her days. We didn't hold our much hope of getting anyone interested in her. Within a month we had three serious offers of homes for her, and Sophie is now happily settled in Suffolk with her new family. We then took a 9 year old bitch, Cassie, and within two weeks had several people interested in giving her a home. She too is now very happy and settled in her new home. Thank you to all those people willing to give our "Golden Girls" a chance of a new home. It has really spurred us on to know that there are people out there who love this breed and have enough heart to care for the old as well as the young. We now have a waiting list for oldies! Absolutely wonderful!

In November we moved to another kennels. We had been at Barn Owl for 6 years and were very happy with the kennels. The owners let the field that we used out to a guy who was doing security dog training courses. We did not feel that it was appropriate for a rescue to be in any way associated with this kind of training and that it would ultimately be detrimental to the rescue to even appear to condone this kind of training. We have moved to Ladyhaye kennels, who are very kind and look after our dogs very well.

December - we were asked to take a six month old puppy a week before Xmas and one of our kind homes who already have two large dogs, three cats, a rabbit and two kids very kindly offered to foster him. Our thanks to Mel and Kevin for giving this little lad a foster home until we can find him a home .

 

So, the year has been quite a mix - 270 dogs needing homes -heartbreaking. Some of the reasons geniune, some ridiculous.

28 dogs rehomed - our best year ever.

Lots of good homes found as a direct result of the website - money well spent.

Lots of backing and interest from readers of the site - great.

Some very practical help from Lorraine, Kim and Julie, Kevin and Mel - thank you all.

Finally, we would like to thank all of you for your support this year, the dogs really need us all to pull together


OUR OWN DOGS, STAN AND PENNY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


THE THINGS PEOPLE SAY!

 

Caller: Will you take my dog? I paid £800 for it, but I am prepared to let you have it for £400!!!!!

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

Caller: I need to rehome my dog. He has a really good pedigree but I don't want any money for him!

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Caller: I want to get rid of my dog

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Caller : I want to do the best for my dog (means I want to get rid of my dog)

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

Caller: Is that the Rottweiler rescue?

Me: Yes.

Caller: Have you got any boxers?

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Caller: My dog is really getting me down, he wants to play all day, never sits still and I think I really need to rehome him.

Peter: You should have got an old plodder

Caller: I didn't realise you did other breeds as well!

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Shelley :So you need to rehome your dog.

Caller : Yes.

Shelley : Has the dog ever been to training classes?

Caller : No, but my husband has trained the dog and he is really good at dog training.

Shelley : Why are you getting rid of the dog?
Caller : I can't walk it, it pulls me down the road!


RONNIE AND MISTY

AN OWNER'S EXPERIENCE OF TAKING A RESCUE DOG

Ronnie (formerly Rocky)

Nickname - Grrrrr face

 Ronnie came to live with us in January 2004 at the tender age of 9 months.

We'd recently lost our staffie, Dixie, who had to be put to sleep at the age of 14, just before Xmas 2003 which left us with our darling Misty, a rottie x aged 16 months. Misty pined terribly when Dixie passed away and for a pup that had never been vocal, not a day went by when she didn't cry. We felt that she needed a buddy and by chance we found out about Peter Beach from a boarding kennels in Guildford when we went to drop off my sister's staffie on Boxing Day. We went straight home and called. Early New Year Shelley came to carry out our Home Check and after intensive discussions with Peter we arranged to go and meet Ronnie. We had decided that if he and Misty didn't get along then it wasn'r to be. Peter had warned us that Ronnie was a big puppy and had a few problems due to the reasons he had been rescued. Well, we needn't have worried. Misty took charge immediately and that is pretty much how it has stayed

We took them both to training. (This is a story in itself!) and over the ten weeks we didn't really seem to be getting anywhere. However, when it came to the exam day, they both turned into these wonderful well behaved dogs that passed with flying colours, much to our surprise. They even have the certificates!.

Ronnie has turned 4 now. We moved from Hampshire to Cornwall a year ago and the dogs absolutely adore it here. Their quality of life has changed and it has done wonders for their socialising. Ronnie hasn't been the most sociable dog, when it came to meeting other dogs, in particular. He has now discovered horses, cows and even goats. Oh, and seaweed, which we can only imagine must taste wonderful for the amount he will try to consume when he goes swimming in the sea. He will dive completely under the water to get a lump of seaweed. Misty also loves to swim and chase sticks along the beach.

It hasn't been an easy journey with Ronnie. He was an extremely frightened and disturbed puppy when he came to us. He had had no training or discipline and bounced off the furniture like a highly charged Tigga. If he didn't get his own way he growled, nipped and bounced some more. He is extremely dominant and it took about three months to get some normality back in the house. Misty played a big part in Ronnie's development, as he learnt a lot from watching , playing and being put in his place by her. They adore each other but Misty still has the last say. Ronnie is such a gent.

He is still very dominant, but dotes on everything Jay says. Ronnie is obedient and a joy to have around. He and Misty are a team. We have managed to achieve his training withour force. This has taken a lot of time. love and perseverance. We were determined not to break Ronnie's spirit and we have achieved this.

Our journey with Ronnie and Misty has been an incredible learning curve for us.

Thank you to kind, generous and completely dedicated, giving people such as Peter and Shelley. We have been blessed with this wonderful gift of Ronnie.


 

JADE - THE PAT DOG

We have just recieved these lovely photos of Jade, a rescue rott who belongs to the Slogrove family. Jade visits Scout troops and educates young people about how wonderful this breed can be in the right hands. Jade and her family also always support the rescue, and we are proud to know both them and Jade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


THE REUNION

As some of you may remember, a couple of years ago we took a pair of young dogs, Billy and Bonny into our care. They had been kept outside from eight weeks old, as the owner wanted them to be guard dogs for his pub.

When we took them they were seven months old and both had severe leg problems. Both had developed osteochondritis, a growth problem which causes immense pain and requires an operation to resolve the problem.

Billy and Bonny initially went into kennels, and we have never seen two such pathetic puppies. It took them ten minutes to walk a two minute walk. Bonny used to cry and whine with pain, and Billy just used to sit and refuse to go anywhere.

Our vet x rayed them both, and the news was not great. Bonny needed an operation on one of her front legs, to remove the cartilage in her elbow joint that was causing her so much pain, and poor Billy needed two operations for the same thing, on both his front legs.

Shelley then took Billy and Bonny home, and we had the operations done. The after care took weeks, as they both had to have very steady "little and often" exercise to build up their muscles and help them recover well. On top of this, they needed to be housetrained and learn some basic commands as they had never been taught anything.

After three months, Bonny went to live with Lee and Dawn and their German Shepherd, Max.

Billy was with us for longer as he had to have two seperate operations. So, six months later we rehomed Billy. Unfortunately, their marriage broke down and Billy came back to us.

In January of this year, Billy went to live with Darren, who had just lost his old rott. Billy goes and stays with Darren's Mum and the retriever when he is at work.

It had been about 18 months since Billy and Bonny had seen each other - but they had always been very close - almost like twins, so we all wanted to see how they would react when they met up again.

They were both very pleased to see each other, and all the dogs got on very well together as you can see.

This was probably one of the most rewarding cases to work with, and to see both dogs running around having fun really does make it all worthwhile.
bilbon

 

 

 

 

 

bilbon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to Lee, Dawn and Darren for giving these lovely dogs such nice homes. I'm sure they will all meet up again soon.


 

ericandrosie

ERIC AND ROSIE

Eric and Rosie live with Simon and Jill in Norfolk. They have had four rotts from us over the years and these two keep them on their toes!

When Simon and Jill took Eric he was extremely destructive and ate two sofas! They have now had Eric for about five years, and Rosie for about six years and both dogs are really lovely pets.

Unfortunately, Eric has developed epilepsy but this hasn't really slowed him down very much. As you can see, Eric loves Xmas!


 

Today we went to see a dog that we rehomed about six years ago. Pluto was two when we rehomed him to Jill and Mark, and has been a loyal family pet. Pluto is still a very vocal dog, who likes to tell everyone what he thinks! Unfortunately, Pluto has developed severe arthritis, but is still the same loving dog he always was, just a bit slower. He has been joined in the family home by Poppet, another rescue dog who had been used as a breeding machine. She is a quieter, less confident dog than Pluto, but very affectionate and people orientated. Lucky dogs to have such a caring home.

plutopoppet


 

The Rottweiler is in trouble. They are a large powerful breed that needs firm but fair handling, ongoing socialisation from puppyhood and obedience training.

The breed originated in Germany, where it was used as a cattle herding dog. It was also used for guarding, being a powerful, confident dog. Today, we see this breed in the hands of people who do not understand the dogs needs - i.e. physical and mental stimulation. In sensible hands. the rottweiler can be a loving gentle family pet.

As a small rescue, we work "hands on" with the dogs in our care, five days a week. Most of these dogs are in rescue through no temperament or behaviour problem, but because their owners did not give enough thought about long term commitment to keeping the dog. The most common reasons are - a new baby coming, a new job and house repossessions and marriage break ups. Generally they have not given enough time to training and socialisation either.

Dogs that come into our care usually know how to give their paw - something almost every new puppy owner teaches their dog in the first few days of owning it. We have yet to get a dog into care who knows how to sit and wait at the kerb - surely far more important.

In the last three months we have taken, on average four calls a week on behaviour and training issues as a result of starting a website. Most of the people who call us are caring, but have not researched this breed or its needs before buying a dog. They feel they can train it themselves but when the dog is 18 months old and tries to determine its place in the pack, the owner decides to get some advice. Happily, for most of these dogs a behaviour programme combined with training and socialisation will iron out these potentially serious problems. However, this will depend on the commitment of the owner to the dog, their time and patience.

In recent months, there have been several attacks on children by rottweilers. In every case I have heard, the dogs have been either used for guarding purposes, or are in the hands of someone other than the owner, or totally unsupervised. The majority of these dogs are male and have not been neutered, thus allowing them a percieved status which is unacceptable within a human pack, but perfectly normal within a dog pack.

No dog should be in the care of a person who is not physically and mentally willing and capable of controlling it.

When a litter of puppies is sold by one of the "big" breeders, they talk to the new owners about the vital training and socialisation required to make the dog a pleasant sociable adult. The problem is that the "big" breeders have years of experience and are totally commited to the breed and so many of them will assume that the new owner will go on to become as devoted as they are to the needs of the dogs.

The new owner takes their puppy home and either does or does not do the required training and socialisation. When the dog is old enough, they decide that they will have a litter from it (or in the case of a male dog, allow it to mate a bitch). They then have to impart, a very limited knowledge of the breed on to the new owners, who, once again, either do or do not train and socialise correctly. You can see how quickly the knowledge and expertise is watered down, generation of dog after generation of dog.

Rescues rarely have to take into care a dog from one of the well known breeders, but we often take in dogs with the big breeders dogs only two generations back in their pedigree.

As a rescue, we are now in a situation where we are struggling to find homes for these dogs. We do not even have a waiting list for puppies. Only the experienced rottweiler owner or the "macho" man who wants a dog for the wrong reason wants a rottweiler.

We do our best to ensure that the dogs in our care go only to good, loving pet homes. We always do a home check and a follow up visit. We ensure that all members of the family meet the dog(this includes other pets). We are on hand to answer any problems they may have whilst settling the dog in and are always available by phone for help and advice whether the dog is from our rescue or not.

All our dogs are temperament assessed by ourselves, and we always tell the new owners about any history we have about the dog. Most importantly, ALL our dogs go to their new homes neutered, as we feel there are enough unwanted dogs without any accidental litters being born, but also that neutering makes the dog a less frustrated and challenging individual to live with.

This breed is very misunderstood but we need to address the problems of overbreeding, and educating owners to make sure they are willing to do the extensive training and socialisation to make sure that their dog is a dog that is safe to own, and a good ambassador for the breed..


 

 

 

 


Please send us your news and views or any amusing stories you may have about your own dogs. We would love to hear from you -so send in your photos, and tell us your experiences of owning a Rottweiler.
SYNCHRONISED PEEINGSYNCHRONISED PEEING!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


REMI DOG

 

remdogSadly, our lovely Remi had to be put to sleep last week. She had been suffering from a bone tumour and had fought bravely for almost two years. Until the last few days, she had been her usual happy self, eating and waddling around the garden with no more than a slight limp as evidence of her condition. She was thirteen years old. Until she came to Peter, she had been tied up in a garden, but kept escaping. On one occasion she was in a road traffic accident and was left with an untreated fractured pelvis. The local dog warden rescued her and brought her to Peter, who brought her home for some special care after her spaying operation - and she never left! She loved her "Dad" and was quite possessive about him! She has left a big gap in our lives and the house - it's too quiet despite the other two charging about.

 


 

FROM 7TH APRIL 2007 THE DOCKING OF TAILS IS BANNED.

Many people like a dog with a docked tail, and may not be so keen to own a dog with a natural waggy tail. Initially, I feel that we may see an even greater number of abandoned or unwanted dogs, but hopefully the numbers of rottweilers being bred will drop significantly once breeders realise that the puppies are not selling. Only true lovers of the breed will buy a rott with a tail. A rott with a tail looks so much softer, so hopefully, the "macho" owners will not be so interested in owning a rottweiler.



If anyone has any ideas on fundraising, or would like to do some fundraising for us, please get in touch. The veterinary treatment that these dogs need seems to be rising year on year, as many owners do not even get their dogs innoculated or wormed. We also feel that it would be wrong to refuse to help a dog just because it needs veterinary treatment, but finances are not inexhaustable.


We get many new owners on the phone who have been surprised by the reaction of members of the public and other dog owners to their rotts. Many people who contact us are rather frightened by the adverse reactions of the public to their dog. The most common complaint from the public is that the dog will automatically be unsafe around other dogs. If you have a friendly, sociable dog that lives happily with other breeds - please let us know .hattie


The pile of Pedigrees grows higher in our office- dogs we have taken into care for one reason or another. Everyone is quick to tell us that their dog has "a very good Pedigree" - and very often they are right. These dogs have very well known show dogs within one or two generations. It is however a pity that we do not have an equally high pile of up to date vaccination cards!

These dogs with the "very good pedigree" do not suddenly become a lesser dog when they come into rescue. We often hear people saying "oh, my dog is a pedigree, that one is only a rescue. Where do they think these rescue dogs come from ? They started out as puppies, bred by someone, just the same as your very good pedigree dogs did - they didn't just fall out of the sky.

Many of these dogs are still "very good pedigree" dogs - just because they have come into the care of rescue does not make them any less good natured, well bred or loving pets who deserve a caring home.

ANY IDEAS FOR A SUITABLE CAPTION FOR THIS PHOTO?

 

FAIRYIN THE FOREST

 

So far we have only had a couple of ideas

 

"There's a fairy at the bottom of my garden"

and

"You Jane, Me Tarzan".